2021 environmental biosecurity webinar series

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Knock Knock. Who’s there?

Drawing attention to our most unwanted visitors

Thank you for visiting our 2021 environmental biosecurity webinar series Have Your Say page. We will update this page with recordings, slides, links and information related to each webinar as they happen.

Focus

Our webinar series focus this year is the National Priority List of Exotic Environmental Pests, Weeds and Diseases. It’s also known as the Exotic Environmental Pest List (EEPL).

Over a series of 7 monthly webinars, we will share:

  • why environmental biosecurity matters
  • how the EEPL was developed
  • how the risks identified could affect our environment, public spaces, heritage and way of life.

It is important to note that the EEPL is focused on exotic (not established) pests, weeds and diseases that affect Australia's environment and amenity. It complements existing pest lists and strategies in biosecurity. Other exotic pest lists include: the top 42 National Priority Plant Pests, the Australian Priority Marine Pest List and the National list of notifiable animal diseases.

For established pests there is the Australian Pest Animal Strategy, the Australian Weeds Strategy and the Weeds of National Significance.

How to register

We host each webinar on Microsoft Teams. We email registered participants a link with joining information.

If you would like to participate, register on our Eventbrite page.

How to participate

We encourage you to sign the guestbook to introduce yourself.

Use the forums or Q&A functions to share your ideas or ask any questions not covered in the livestream

Contact us

Email acebo@awe.gov.au.

Knock Knock. Who’s there?

Drawing attention to our most unwanted visitors

Thank you for visiting our 2021 environmental biosecurity webinar series Have Your Say page. We will update this page with recordings, slides, links and information related to each webinar as they happen.

Focus

Our webinar series focus this year is the National Priority List of Exotic Environmental Pests, Weeds and Diseases. It’s also known as the Exotic Environmental Pest List (EEPL).

Over a series of 7 monthly webinars, we will share:

  • why environmental biosecurity matters
  • how the EEPL was developed
  • how the risks identified could affect our environment, public spaces, heritage and way of life.

It is important to note that the EEPL is focused on exotic (not established) pests, weeds and diseases that affect Australia's environment and amenity. It complements existing pest lists and strategies in biosecurity. Other exotic pest lists include: the top 42 National Priority Plant Pests, the Australian Priority Marine Pest List and the National list of notifiable animal diseases.

For established pests there is the Australian Pest Animal Strategy, the Australian Weeds Strategy and the Weeds of National Significance.

How to register

We host each webinar on Microsoft Teams. We email registered participants a link with joining information.

If you would like to participate, register on our Eventbrite page.

How to participate

We encourage you to sign the guestbook to introduce yourself.

Use the forums or Q&A functions to share your ideas or ask any questions not covered in the livestream

Contact us

Email acebo@awe.gov.au.

Guestbook

Welcome! Feel free to introduce yourself and tell us why you're here and where you're from

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Hi, Josephine Mead, Project Officer for Warren Biosecurity Inc, a community NFP formed to tackle the control of C3 widespread and established pests in the south west of Western Australia. Look for Manjimup on the map.
A recognised biosecurity group is "responsible" for community engagement which has all land owners complying with BAM Act 2007 s30, to control pests on their property. While community led work is sensible, the reality is they have poor funding and virtually no authority over their activities. I would like to contribute to the discussion which, as Dt Sheppard says, needs a systems approach across departments which allows efficient sharing of property and pest information which fosters collaboration. Further, government departments, such as conservation departments, must be adequately funded in order to comply with their obligations under law. Otherwise, private landowners & industry will not feel motivated to bother. Why should they? Josephine.

Josephine 6 months ago