National Farm Forestry Strategy

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We are developing a National Farm Forestry Strategy to help build Australia’s future wood resource through increased farm forestry. Your feedback will help us:

  • Identify how we can support farmers and landholders to integrate farm forestry with agriculture to diversify on-farm income and improve productivity
  • Increase the potential for farm forestry to address natural resource management and biodiversity issues
  • Understand risks and opportunities for farm forestry in a changing climate.

We are keen to understand the views of farmers, landholders, forest growers, investors, industry groups and natural resource management bodies on how all levels of government can work together to support the uptake of farm forestry.

The survey should take about 10 minutes and closes at 5.00pm (AEST) 17 December 2021.

Background

Farm forestry – sometimes called 'agroforestry'– is the establishment or management of trees or forest stands (either plantation or native forest) on private agricultural land for commercial benefit including wood production but also for farm management, environmental or aesthetic reasons. Farm forestry can take many forms – plantations on farms, woodlots, timber belts, wide‑spaced tree plantings, Indigenous forestry, and sustainably managed private native forests.

The increasing demand for wood products, changes to public native forest access and new carbon sequestration initiatives are bringing more value to all wood resources. At the same time, there’s an increased appetite for investment in new sources of sustainably sourced wood. This creates opportunities for landholders to establish and manage farm forestry plantations and native forests to diversify their incomes and improve on-farm productivity.

Increasing the area of farm forestry will provide new wood resources for industry and create improved economic, employment and social opportunities for rural and regional communities. Farm forestry can also strengthen landscape resilience by using trees to address existing natural resource management issues like soil and water protection.

Farmers and landholders are central to increasing farm forestry. Growing trees is also a long-term investment and farmers and landholders need information that will help them consider how to achieve their objectives by planting ‘the right tree in the right place at the right scale’. To achieve its full potential, farm forestry needs to be fully integrated into existing commercial supply chains. Landholders also need to be able to actively participate in the establishment, management, and transport of wood products from their land.

Several state governments have identified the potential of farm forestry. There is also strong support from the National Farmers Federation for farmers to use farm forestry tree plantings to supplement primary agriculture. There are barriers to participation that must be addressed if we are going to increase farm forestry in Australia.

The Australian Government released The National Forest Industries Plan Growing a better Australia – A billion trees for jobs and growth (2018) which supports measures to transform farm forestry as a commercial enterprise supplying timber to Australia’s forestry sector and, recognises the role that plantation trees on farms around regional forestry hubs can play in supplying Australia’s wood future.

Provide your feedback

To have your say take our survey or upload a written submission by 5.00pm (AEST), 17 December 2021.

We are developing a National Farm Forestry Strategy to help build Australia’s future wood resource through increased farm forestry. Your feedback will help us:

  • Identify how we can support farmers and landholders to integrate farm forestry with agriculture to diversify on-farm income and improve productivity
  • Increase the potential for farm forestry to address natural resource management and biodiversity issues
  • Understand risks and opportunities for farm forestry in a changing climate.

We are keen to understand the views of farmers, landholders, forest growers, investors, industry groups and natural resource management bodies on how all levels of government can work together to support the uptake of farm forestry.

The survey should take about 10 minutes and closes at 5.00pm (AEST) 17 December 2021.

Background

Farm forestry – sometimes called 'agroforestry'– is the establishment or management of trees or forest stands (either plantation or native forest) on private agricultural land for commercial benefit including wood production but also for farm management, environmental or aesthetic reasons. Farm forestry can take many forms – plantations on farms, woodlots, timber belts, wide‑spaced tree plantings, Indigenous forestry, and sustainably managed private native forests.

The increasing demand for wood products, changes to public native forest access and new carbon sequestration initiatives are bringing more value to all wood resources. At the same time, there’s an increased appetite for investment in new sources of sustainably sourced wood. This creates opportunities for landholders to establish and manage farm forestry plantations and native forests to diversify their incomes and improve on-farm productivity.

Increasing the area of farm forestry will provide new wood resources for industry and create improved economic, employment and social opportunities for rural and regional communities. Farm forestry can also strengthen landscape resilience by using trees to address existing natural resource management issues like soil and water protection.

Farmers and landholders are central to increasing farm forestry. Growing trees is also a long-term investment and farmers and landholders need information that will help them consider how to achieve their objectives by planting ‘the right tree in the right place at the right scale’. To achieve its full potential, farm forestry needs to be fully integrated into existing commercial supply chains. Landholders also need to be able to actively participate in the establishment, management, and transport of wood products from their land.

Several state governments have identified the potential of farm forestry. There is also strong support from the National Farmers Federation for farmers to use farm forestry tree plantings to supplement primary agriculture. There are barriers to participation that must be addressed if we are going to increase farm forestry in Australia.

The Australian Government released The National Forest Industries Plan Growing a better Australia – A billion trees for jobs and growth (2018) which supports measures to transform farm forestry as a commercial enterprise supplying timber to Australia’s forestry sector and, recognises the role that plantation trees on farms around regional forestry hubs can play in supplying Australia’s wood future.

Provide your feedback

To have your say take our survey or upload a written submission by 5.00pm (AEST), 17 December 2021.

  • Welcome. We invite you to share your views on what you think a National Farm Forestry Strategy should focus on by taking this short survey or uploading a submission. 

    Your thoughts will help inform the development of the National Farm Forestry Strategy. 

    You will need to register or sign in to participate. Please read our privacy notice before you register.

    The survey closes on 17 December 2021.

    Take survey/add submission
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