Proposed changes to conservation planning decisions

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The Australian Government is continuing to use fit-for-purpose, effective conservation planning tools to improve the status of Australia’s threatened species and ecological communities.

Conservation advices and recovery plans are two planning tools that set out the research and management actions needed to support the recovery of species and ecological communities listed as threatened under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act).

Where required, every species and ecological community listed as threatened (listed entity) will have a conservation advice. Some will also have a recovery plan.

The department is working with the independent Threatened Species Scientific Committee (the Committee) to review previous recovery plan decisions to ensure that the most appropriate and effective plans are in place to guide collaborative investment and action, and regulatory decision making, for each listed entity.

The Committee has developed guidance, outlined in their plan Ongoing modernisation of conservation planning under the EPBC Act, to recommend which threatened species and ecological communities that currently have a recovery plan may no longer need one in addition to a conservation advice.

“The Committee is working with the department in progressing a strategic project to ensure every listed species and ecological community has a conservation plan in place that is fit-for-purpose and provides an efficient, best-practice method for conveying the recovery needs of that entity to all stakeholders.”

- TSSC 2021. ‘Ongoing modernisation of conservation planning under the EPBC Act’

As part of the review process, the department is holding a six-week public consultation period for interested groups and individuals to comment on the Committee's recommendation for individual threatened species or ecological communities.

Provide your comments

The department is seeking your feedback on the proposed changes to the decision for each threatened species or ecological community (‘entities’). You can provide your comments by following the instructions and prompts on this Have Your Say page.

Before you do this, the department recommends you read the guidance document from the Committee. You may also find it useful to read the Frequently Asked Questions. Both documents can be found in the Further Information section at the right-hand side of the page.

To help find you find the species or ecological community you're interested in, we have separated the list of 185 entities into four groups :

  • ecological communities
  • fauna (animal) species
  • flora (plant) species with scientific name beginning between A-E
  • flora (plant) species with scientific name beginning between F-Z.

Click on the links below to be directed to the consultation pages for those groups. You may comment on as many species or ecological communities as you wish by submitting each response, then starting a new submission by selecting a different entity.

To further assist you in finding the species or ecological community you want to comment on, we have also provided lists of entities by the state or territory where they are found, and by broad taxonomic groups such as birds, mammals and fish, in the Further Information section on the right-hand side of this page. Each name in these lists is linked to the Species Profile and Threats Database where you can find further information on the entity including any current recovery plan and/or conservation advice.

What happens next?

After the public consultation period closes, we provide the comments received to the:

  • Threatened Species Scientific Committee
  • Minister for the Environment.

The Minister will consider the comments received in making the final decision, on advice of the Threatened Species Scientific Committee.

The Minister’s final decisions will be published on each entity’s Species Profile and Threats Database profile.

The Australian Government is continuing to use fit-for-purpose, effective conservation planning tools to improve the status of Australia’s threatened species and ecological communities.

Conservation advices and recovery plans are two planning tools that set out the research and management actions needed to support the recovery of species and ecological communities listed as threatened under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act).

Where required, every species and ecological community listed as threatened (listed entity) will have a conservation advice. Some will also have a recovery plan.

The department is working with the independent Threatened Species Scientific Committee (the Committee) to review previous recovery plan decisions to ensure that the most appropriate and effective plans are in place to guide collaborative investment and action, and regulatory decision making, for each listed entity.

The Committee has developed guidance, outlined in their plan Ongoing modernisation of conservation planning under the EPBC Act, to recommend which threatened species and ecological communities that currently have a recovery plan may no longer need one in addition to a conservation advice.

“The Committee is working with the department in progressing a strategic project to ensure every listed species and ecological community has a conservation plan in place that is fit-for-purpose and provides an efficient, best-practice method for conveying the recovery needs of that entity to all stakeholders.”

- TSSC 2021. ‘Ongoing modernisation of conservation planning under the EPBC Act’

As part of the review process, the department is holding a six-week public consultation period for interested groups and individuals to comment on the Committee's recommendation for individual threatened species or ecological communities.

Provide your comments

The department is seeking your feedback on the proposed changes to the decision for each threatened species or ecological community (‘entities’). You can provide your comments by following the instructions and prompts on this Have Your Say page.

Before you do this, the department recommends you read the guidance document from the Committee. You may also find it useful to read the Frequently Asked Questions. Both documents can be found in the Further Information section at the right-hand side of the page.

To help find you find the species or ecological community you're interested in, we have separated the list of 185 entities into four groups :

  • ecological communities
  • fauna (animal) species
  • flora (plant) species with scientific name beginning between A-E
  • flora (plant) species with scientific name beginning between F-Z.

Click on the links below to be directed to the consultation pages for those groups. You may comment on as many species or ecological communities as you wish by submitting each response, then starting a new submission by selecting a different entity.

To further assist you in finding the species or ecological community you want to comment on, we have also provided lists of entities by the state or territory where they are found, and by broad taxonomic groups such as birds, mammals and fish, in the Further Information section on the right-hand side of this page. Each name in these lists is linked to the Species Profile and Threats Database where you can find further information on the entity including any current recovery plan and/or conservation advice.

What happens next?

After the public consultation period closes, we provide the comments received to the:

  • Threatened Species Scientific Committee
  • Minister for the Environment.

The Minister will consider the comments received in making the final decision, on advice of the Threatened Species Scientific Committee.

The Minister’s final decisions will be published on each entity’s Species Profile and Threats Database profile.

  • We are seeking comments on the proposed decisions to not have a recovery plan for 28 threatened ecological communities. Each of these entities will have a conservation advice.

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  • We are seeking comments on the proposed decisions to not have a recovery plan for 53 species of threatened fauna. Each of these entities will have a conservation advice.

    Make a comment
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  • We are seeking comments on the proposed decisions to not have a recovery plan for 57 species of threatened flora. The flora in this list have a scientific name beginning between A and E. Each of these entities will have a conservation advice.

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  • We are seeking comments on the proposed decisions to not have a recovery plan for 47 species of threatened flora. The flora in this list have a scientific name beginning between F and Z. Each of these entities will have a conservation advice.

    Make a comment
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