Regulatory Performance Framework 2018–19 self-assessments

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Public consultation has closed.

We are a new Australian Government department established on 1 February 2020. Before this, we were the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Environment and Energy.

Every year we assess how we perform against the Australian Government’s Regulator Performance Framework.

Before machinery of government changes took effect, the former Department of Agriculture and Department of Environment and Energy prepared self-assessments of their regulatory performance in 2018–19.

We sought your feedback on 8 self-assessments. Seven from the agriculture portfolio and 1 from the environment portfolio.

We are committed to being a best practice regulator. Productive regulation is central to our role protecting our land, water, heritage and environment for today and into the future.

How you had your say

We asked you to:

  • read the relevant self-assessment
  • take the related survey

The survey was open 8 May to 12 June 2020.

What happens next

All feedback provided will be reviewed and considered as part of improvements to how we assess our regulatory performance.

Once finalised, the 2018-19 assessments will be available on the department’s website.

Agriculture

Read the overarching statement for an overview of the former Department of Agriculture’s self-assessment rating scale.

The former department conducted self-assessments for seven regulatory functions including:

Environment and Energy

The former Department of Environment and Energy conducted one self-assessment that covered all their regulatory functions. This includes:

  • protection of the environment and biodiversity, including assessment and approval of activities which impact on matters of national environmental significance including wildlife trade
  • regulation of activities in the Antarctic Treaty Area
  • managing air quality, product standards for small non-road non-diesel engines and regulation of ozone depleting substances and synthetic greenhouse gases
  • managing waste, including regulation of exports of hazardous waste, and administration of product stewardship schemes including e-waste, oil, tyres and the Australian Packaging Covenant
  • renewable energy and energy markets.

Public consultation has closed.

We are a new Australian Government department established on 1 February 2020. Before this, we were the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Environment and Energy.

Every year we assess how we perform against the Australian Government’s Regulator Performance Framework.

Before machinery of government changes took effect, the former Department of Agriculture and Department of Environment and Energy prepared self-assessments of their regulatory performance in 2018–19.

We sought your feedback on 8 self-assessments. Seven from the agriculture portfolio and 1 from the environment portfolio.

We are committed to being a best practice regulator. Productive regulation is central to our role protecting our land, water, heritage and environment for today and into the future.

How you had your say

We asked you to:

  • read the relevant self-assessment
  • take the related survey

The survey was open 8 May to 12 June 2020.

What happens next

All feedback provided will be reviewed and considered as part of improvements to how we assess our regulatory performance.

Once finalised, the 2018-19 assessments will be available on the department’s website.

Agriculture

Read the overarching statement for an overview of the former Department of Agriculture’s self-assessment rating scale.

The former department conducted self-assessments for seven regulatory functions including:

Environment and Energy

The former Department of Environment and Energy conducted one self-assessment that covered all their regulatory functions. This includes:

  • protection of the environment and biodiversity, including assessment and approval of activities which impact on matters of national environmental significance including wildlife trade
  • regulation of activities in the Antarctic Treaty Area
  • managing air quality, product standards for small non-road non-diesel engines and regulation of ozone depleting substances and synthetic greenhouse gases
  • managing waste, including regulation of exports of hazardous waste, and administration of product stewardship schemes including e-waste, oil, tyres and the Australian Packaging Covenant
  • renewable energy and energy markets.